Category Archives: Life with Airedales

2017 Howliday greeting card \ e-card exchange

 

When you fill out this form you are signing up for the 2017 Howliday exchange.

If you signup for the e-card exchange you will receive a list of email addresses of the other participants and you agree to send them an electronic card.

If you sign up for the greeting card exchange you will receive a list of names and postal addresses and you agree to send a physical greeting card in the mail to all of the other participants. Before you agree to this consider that in previous years we have has as many as 40 people sign up. The vast majority of these are in the United States but there are a few international addresses every year.

This year this single form will allow you to sign up for the greeting card, e-card list or both.

We would again like to thank The AireCanada Airedale Rescue Network for the use of their website to host the exchange and all the good work they do year round.

If you don’t receive a confirmation email after filling out the form you are not signed up. Please contact scott@blackops.ca

2014 Howliday greeting card \ e-card exchange

When you fill out this form you are signing up for the 2014  Howliday exchange.

If you signup for the e-card exchange you will receive a list of email addresses of the other participants and you agree to send them an electronic card.

If you sign up for the greeting card exchange you will receive a list of names and postal addresses and you agree to send a physical greeting card in the mail to all of the other participants. Before you agree to this consider that in previous years we have has as many as 60 people sign up. The vast majority of these are in the United States but there are a few international addresses every year.

This year this single form will allow you to sign up for the greeting card, e-card list or both.

Signup will be open until Dec 1

We would again like to thank The AireCanada Airedale Rescue Network for the use of their website to host the exchange and all the good work they do year round.

 

The exchange is closed for this year try again next year.

If you don’t receive a confirmation email after filling out the form you are not signed up. Please contact scott@blackops.ca

 

Remembering Lucy

Lucy 2

[Lucy was a rescued Airedale with a number of challenging behaviors that AireCanada placed some years ago with Michele Bond. Michele recently wrote this touching essay about Lucy. We wish that all those Airedales who are adopted through rescue could  be so lucky as to have an owner with the sense — and sensitivity — of Michele Bond. AireCanada thanks her and her family very, very  much for their loving care of Lucy.]

Lucy passed away on Monday.

I have been so privileged to have been a part of her life. I know I have said it many times but Lucy taught me so much. No, the first year wasn’t easy. I was devastated when people were trying to convince me she was too difficult and that I should give her up. I am so glad I didn’t. She and I both had things to learn. She needed to trust me and I needed to accept her limitations and know that she was never going to be totally secure around other dogs.

She was the softest, kindest dog . She only had that one problem….but don’t we all! She became so well trained and was always just my side kick. I had to know where she was at all times. She had to always be in my view. I had to be fully aware of our surroundings and plan our moves. Even in the house with people around I had to make sure doors weren’t opened….or doors were closed. Thus she became my shadow….attentive to what I wanted from her. She actually never walked out a door or gate without looking at me for permission. This all sounds difficult and time consuming but it became second nature to us both. She achieved instant recall so if she was in the yard and spotted a rabbit to chase, I could call and she would come to my side. She knew her muzzle was a good thing, brought fun times and was always accepting of putting it on.

I am so proud of her.

I am still in disbelief and shock that she is gone. There had been little things since after Christmas. Maybe it all started with the teeth grinding and chattering. We had two teeth pulled that may have been an issue but turned out were not. The grinding just mysteriously ended. I always thought it was environmental as we were living in a situation where many neighbours, including myself, were suffering from headaches, coughs etc. In January, she seemed to be not eating and was lethargic so we put her on a two week program of antibiotics. That seemed to do the trick and she was back to her goofy Airedale self.

We went away for two weeks and when we got home on Monday, she was happy and bouncy, but earlier that day she had fallen over. After that she didn’t want to walk far, but other signs were all good….eating…..drinking…..no temperature.…pink gums and capillary refill time was great….bowels good. She still wanted to play….jump on the bed to sleep.

Lucy 1

Sunday night — her last night — she still had her dinner and her plate-licker specials. She slept in my room as always but didn’t get on the bed. She got up about three times during the night to change positions but stayed in the room. In the morning, I let her out and she did her business but then became disoriented so I helped her into the house and made a vet appointment.

That was when I realized she was not going to make it. She went to her favorite place in the kitchen where she would sit and watch the cooking preparations in hope something would fall her way (and, of course, it always did). I lay down beside her for a little, and talked to her. Just as we were preparing to take her to the hospital, she left us. I don’t know why I was disturbing her to take her to the hospital. I knew she was dying and, actually, by that time, even though she had vital signs, she really wasn’t there.

Among many other things, Lucy taught me that there are many ways to own a dog. She taught me not to believe everything you read or are told by trainers, to trust your own instincts, to do the things that work for you and your dog.

I learned how important it was to work with the dog YOU have.

Dogs do not always need other dogs for companionship. Dogs don’t need to walk in different places for variety; yes, it would be nice, but sometimes it’s not possible. We walked every day, one direction or the other, and she was just as excited and enthusiastic as the day before. I never became the calm owner when other dogs would try to approach. There were too many altercations when I didn’t know better that made me permanently nervous but I can’t believe Lucy didn’t understand that of me. I am convinced she knew how much I loved her….fought for her….protected her…and that is the important thing.

Thank you for Lucy. Sending her to me turned out the way it should. I am so very sad right now but I know having her in my life was a good thing.

2013 Howliday greeting card \ e-card exchange

When you fill out this form you are signing up for the 2013  Howliday exchange.

If you signup for the e-card exchange you will receive a list of email addresses of the other participants and you agree to send them an electronic card.

If you sign up for the greeting card exchange you will receive a list of names and postal addresses and you agree to send a physical greeting card in the mail to all of the other participants. Before you agree to this consider that in previous years we have has as many as 60 people sign up. The vast majority of these are in the United States but there are a few international addresses every year.

This year this single form will allow you to sign up for the greeting card, e-card list or both.

Signup will be open until Dec 1

We would again like to thank The AireCanada Airedale Rescue Network for the use of their website to host the exchange and all the good work they do year round.

If you don’t receive a confirmation after filling out the form email please contact scott@blackops.ca

The list is now closed for 2013.

Please check back next year

 

Rescue Copper Wins CGN Certificate!

Copper
Copper

Rescueboy Copper, an Airedale who spent much of his early life outdoors by himself, passed the CKC Canine Good Neighbour test recently. His current owner is very happy with his results.

In the test, he had to accept a friendly stranger, politely accept petting, walk politely, walking through a crowd, sit/down on command and stay in place, come when called (long line), accept a strange dog, accept a strange object (trolly) being pushed around and passed him, supervised isolation for 3 min., and politely walk through a door. Copper had to pass all these activities to earn the CGN certificate

AirCanada would like to congratulate both Copper and his owner, Teri, for a terrific achievement. This shows what good care and excellent training can accomplish. Our thanks to Copper’s present owner not only for rescuing and choosing to provide a home for Copper but also  for her ability to see the intelligence and potential in this Airedale. We salute you both!

Happy Holidays

Happy Holidays from Ben, Lizi, Jasmine, Tasha, Henry and everyone at AireCanada

YellowDog

Sverige Danmark Norge Suomi/Finland USA United Kingdom Island Slovensko Holland Germany
Spain Poland France Czech Republic Taiwan Italia China

YELLOWDOG – FROM THE BEGINNING

Some dogs need space

If you see a dog with a yellow ribbon on the leash this is a dog who needs some space. Please do not approach this dog or its people with your dog. They are indicating that their dog cannot be near other dogs. How close is too close? Only the dog or his people know, so maintain distance or give them time to move out of your way.

There are many reasons why a dog may need space:

Maybe he has health issues or is in training.
She may be a rescue dog being rehabilitated. The world can be a very scary place for these dogs.
He may have had a bad experience with another dog or just not like the kind of friendly dogs who always want to say “Hi!”

In short, a yellow marker on a dog means it needs a little space.

 

 

Thank you! Those of us who own these
dogs appreciate your help and respect.
print a copy (PDF)

Translation: Amy Samida, Michigan, US

What is Yellow Dog?

Yellow Dog is a campaign that appears in several countries. A campaign for the dogs who need more space.
By a yellow marker on the leash, I can show that my dog needs more space. Maybe temporarily, or for a longer period.

A dog in pain may be scared to get hurt. Or a dog that is adopted may feel that the environment is daunting and requires careful training for a long period.

Or why not on a bitch in heat, so male dog owners can see without having to get close. Even children can learn that yellow means that you can not go to close. Help us to keep the campaign further, it is operated on a voluntary basis and we depend on you visitors to be successful. Thanks in advance!

Contact

Do You have questions about our campaign?
Do You want to contribute? Or other things about the campaign in Your mind?

Please contact us (form) »

Facebook
Sverige/Sweden
Norge/Norway
Island/Iceland
Tyskland/Deutschland
Slovakien/Slovensko
Italien/Italia
Holland/Netherlands
England/United Kingdom
International Page

Do you know about FB pages? Please tell us or ask us för help if you wan’t to start one!

 

 


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